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How it Works

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We save millions of stock and option data points

then, calculate all sorts of statistics

hyperbola of water drops

to find trade ideas with high yields and high probabilities for you

Data Used in Analysis

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Historical Data

The system crunches years of historical data and stock behavior under different conditions so it can create theoretical values and probabilities as trading benchmarks.

Current Data

The system continuously scans in order to detect areas where the current market prices have diverged from theoretical values.

Forward Looking Data

The system compiles data from press releases, investor relations websites and SEC filings to detect forward looking potential catalyst events such as upcoming earnings, PDUFA dates, investor meetings and conferences.

Here's an example

The best credit put spreads with high yields

Symbol
Yield1
Days2
TSLA
81.8%
15

AMD
69.5%
15

PDD
66.7%
22

NFLX
61.3%
8

MRVL
60.0%
22

JD
51.5%
22

BBY
51.5%
15

NEM
51.5%
15

QQQ
49.8%
8

SNAP
75.4%
29

1 Yields displayed are POTENTIAL rewards. Yields are based on the option premium collected divided by the amount at risk. Click on a symbol for more details.

2 The days displayed show you how many calendar days are left until expiration.

What are the Yields?

The yield is the expected option premium earned in relation to the amount you have at risk.

The table above displays the yields for selling Credit Put Spreads. Option contracts are financial instruments that can be used as protection for an investor's holdings (like car insurance is protection for your car). Just Like car insurance premiums, the options protection costs money, which is determined by the options markets trading on various exchanges.

The buyer pays the premium (like buying car insurance) in hopes that the stock price declines below a certain price at expiration. While the seller receives the premium (like an insurance company) in hopes that the stock price remains the same or goes above a certain level at expiration. If that happens, the seller keeps the entire premium and makes a profit.

Most importantly, the strategy has a defined risk because a put spread involves selling an option and buying another option to stop out the loss. Finally, the yield is calculated by taking the premium you stand to make divided by the amount you have at risk.

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Disclaimer

Stock and option trading involves risk that may not be suitable for all investors. Prior to buying or selling an option, you should read the Options Clearing Corporation's Characteristics and Risks of Options.


The information is provided for informational purposes only and should not be construed as investment advice. All stock price information is provided and transmitted as received from independent third-party data sources. The Information should only be used as a starting point for doing additional independent research in order to allow you to form your own opinion regarding investments and trading strategies. The Company does not guarantee the accuracy, completeness or timeliness of the Information.